Posts Tagged ‘reed knife sharpening’

Jake Lieberstein – Now a Jende Reed Knife Retailer!

November 20, 2014

I’d like to welcome Jake Liebertstein to the Jende Reed Knife family! I first met Jake a few years back at a reed knife seminar at Oboe Works when they were at Columbus Circle in NY City. He was one of those students who took a deep interest in reed knife sharpening, and subsequently, in my method of sharpening reed knives. I’ve always been impressed with his work ethic and dedication to his oboe, and I’ve been particularly proud to watch his sharpening skills mature over the years.

I bumped into Jake again this past summer at IDRS in Manhattan, and was happy to find that he is now living in Chicago, and that he was ready to take on a few items to sell in his thriving reed making business. I was, and still am, honored that one of the first things he wished to sell was the Jende Reed Knife. So if you are in Chicago, or know Jake, look him up. He’s in the process of getting his webpage up, in the meantime, please contact him at jlieberstein@gmail.com.Kit-15

Advertisements

Oboes.ch Reed Knife + 1,500 grit Shapton Pro Travel Sharpening Stone (2 Videos)

March 27, 2014

An introduction to using the Swiss Star Knife from Oboes.Ch on a custom 1,500 Shapton Pro grit travel stone by Tom Blodgett of Jende Industries, LLC.
This video first introduces the 1,500 grit Shapton Pro 1″ x 6″ stone, which is mounted to an aluminum base for better stability. The stone is stored dry in a sheath and just needs a quick splash of water before use. Then he uses the Oboes.ch Swiss Star Reed beveled reed knife to demonstrate how to properly use the stone in order to refresh an edge that is simply tired or dull, but otherwise in good condition.

The second video shows how to effectively account for the rounding by using a permanent marker to mark the edge. On older single bevel reed knives, there is almost always rounding that has occurred at the edge, either through sharpening and/or stone wear over time. When touching up the edge of the reed knife, it should remove the marker from the edge of the blade. If you use the travel stone on your older reed knife, it may not work when the blade is placed flat on the stone. If it does not remove the ink when flat, then the blade should be raised off the stone slightly in order to abrade the actual edge.

This stone can also be used on hollow ground knives and of reed knives of all makes. Enjoy!

2012 Oboe Summer Session at Northwestern University

June 28, 2012

It was only about a week since the whirlwind Blade show in Atlanta, and I was already on the road again – this time for a couple of Reed Knife Sharpening Seminars. The first one was at Northwestern University’s Summer Session for Oboe, hosted by Robert Morgan (who is also the purveyor of Chicago Reed Company, and inventor of the W.R.I.S.T.). The second, which is written up in another post, was at one of the Bocal Majority and Operation O.B.O.E. Camps in Austin, Texas, hosted by Jennifer Auerbach.

Once again, the travel Gods were on my side – although I think they were cutting it close! A typhoon had just passed through Taiwan and Hong Kong hours before I was scheduled to leave. The plane was a little late getting into Hong Kong, and I literally had to run across from one wing of the airport to the other, and my fate rested in whether or not my suitcase would make it to the plane in time. Luckily it made it with only minutes to spare!

I arrived to lovely summer weather in Chicago and headed to the Evanston campus of Northwestern University, which is a beautiful campus on the lake loaded with a wonderful variety of architecture. I made my way to the Music Admin Building and quickly found the exhibit room, where I bumped into a few familiar faces, including Shawna Lake of Oboe Chicago,  Heidi Brann of HB Reeds, and  Carlos Coelho of Carlos Oboe . In fact, we were the only exhibitors, as this was a more intimate setting with about 20 attendees for the 3 day camp.

After lunch, while Carlos gave a class on basic oboe care and maintenance, I was able to catch up with Heidi and Shawna, who I haven’t seen since last year’s IDRS conference. We had a stimulating discussion that covered a lot of the “business talk” that we don’t normally get to do at the conferences, with each of us throwing out ideas for the others. Of course, we talked while I sharpened up Heidi’s Jende Reed Knife. 😀

When it came time to sharpen Shawna’s Jende Reed Knife, I had my work cut out for me… Somehow the bevel had grown into a 50+ degree angle on the back side. The good news was the front face of the knife was very much intact. It took a little effort, but I finally got that bevel back under control, and sharpened up to a brand new 15K edge.

After the exhibits shut down for the day, Robert took me back to his lovely 1920’s two-family style home where he and his wife treated me to BBQ Seattle Salmon, BBQ vegetables, fried sweet potatoes, and some nice white wine. It was delectable! But before we could relax too much, we headed back to the university to attend John Henes’s first of two Alexander Technique classes.

John worked with the students one by one, having them play as he made them aware of what their bodies were doing while they played. With a few simple changes in body stature or distribution of their weight, the sound quality and volume of each student noticeably improved. It was every bit as informative to simply watch and listen to John work his magic with the Alexander Technique as it would be to participate, and it is really a must-do for people from all walks of life.

Saturday started off with a meticulously fresh brewed cup of coffee (great food is the standard in the Morgan home!) as Robert and I discussed some ideas for reed knives over a breakfast of eggs, muffins and fresh fruit with Greek yogurt. Afterward, Robert’s wonderful wife Sandy – an accomplished flutist and amazing cook – took me downtown to the farmer’s market. There was also an arts and crafts festival taking place that was taking up several blocks of downtown Evanston. It was still a little early, but as we walked through the street toward the market, we stumbled upon the very knowledgeable Ms. Rachel, who was setting up a stand called Poetic Earth, which specializes in amazing leather bags and leather bound journals that must be seen (and smelled!) to be believed. They tan their own hides using environmentally-friendly methods and engrave and emboss them by hand – some with amazingly intricate designs.  They also make their own journal paper from cotton. I bought a small leather bound pocket journal, and I already feel more important!

Rachel from Poetic Earth

We got to the farmer’s market, and the first thing I saw was Joseph Schmidt of To The Point Onsite Sharpening Service busy sharpening one of the plenty of knives he needed to sharpen. I slowly circled while I observed him in action, and then struck up a friendly conversation with him. It was clear he knew what he was doing, starting with his water cooled Tormek and finishing with his paper wheel setup. While I’m not a huge fan of the paper wheels myself (but that’s another issue, entirely), there was no question that Joseph was getting excellent results and was well trained on the system. His overall technique of sharpening left me feeling all warm inside that the Evanston farmer’s market was truly in good hands!

Joseph Schmidt of To The Point Sharpening

After a few minutes of me invading Joseph’s personal space to check out his equipment, I caught back up with Sandy as she continued making her rounds, buying all kinds of amazingly fresh vegetables and fruits – much of which would show up in that night’s dinner – and we headed over to the university (that was why I was there, don’t forget!).

As I arrived at the exhibit area and started preparing for my reed knife sharpening seminar, Shawna’s table was abuzz with people trying out her extensive, yet personalized selection of oboes and English horns. She really took the time and focused all her attention on each person who was playing, and had a genuine interest in finding that perfect instrumental match for her customers. Heidi was hard at work making her reeds – which are catching on with oboists like wildfire – with a huge smile, thanks to a freshly sharpened knife. I remember meeting Heidi a couple of years ago at her first IDRS convention as an exhibitor, and she has really grown her business since then. People like Shawna and Heidi really make our little double reed society such a wonderful place!

Just after lunch, double reed repairman extraordinaire Paul Kober arrived. Paul has been a repairman for over 20 years, and has apprenticed at both Howarth of London (in Worthing) and with Fox. Oboe Chicago uses his services exclusively – that’s how good he is! He set up and quickly started tackling some oboes.

FINALLY, it was time for my seminar! We decided to move it into the exhibit area, where everyone crammed into the room. People know I usually take one or two reed knives from the group to demonstrate my sharpening methods, so they were all waiting with eager eyes and reed knives in hand.

Reed Knife Sharpening Seminar

I gave my seminar, complete with a hollow ground and a single bevel knife demonstration, a power point slide show, and even live microscope pictures. Much to my surprise, no one seemed to glaze over, and I only cracked one bad joke about bacon – although there were a few references to Shawna’s reed knife in there, too…

Afterward, Robert, Shawna and I went back home for dinner, which was BBQ white sea bass with some kind of amazing sauce Sandy conjured up, sautéed mushrooms, string beans, and scallions, as well as a fresh tomato, cucumber, basil and  mozzarella salad. Rosé and red wines were flowing, as was the wonderful dinner conversation that strengthened our tight bonds even more.

Once again, before we could get too comfortable, we needed to head out to catch the second of John Henes’s Alexander Technique class, which was a continuation of the previous evening’s class, thus giving John the chance to work with all the attendees. He’s truly a knowledgeable and gifted man and it was really a learning experience for all of us.

Sunday morning started off with another perfectly crafted cup of coffee, and Sandy whipped up a mouthwatering spinach and mushroom frittata, topped with some parmesan cheese. We also had a mixed bowl of the fresh blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, peaches and cantaloupe from the farmer’s market. I was truly being spoiled!

After saying my goodbyes to Sandy, Robert and I headed out to the university where he was scheduled to give his reed making class. I still had some sharpening to do, so I headed to the exhibit area to get some work done.

The rest of the day was pretty quiet. Heidi, Shawna, Paul and I were able to talk shop, and we naturally conspired how to take over the double reed world 😀

As if this leg of the trip couldn’t get any better, I went to meet and stay with Chuck, a friend from the Keeping Sharp Forum. Chuck is also quite the foodie, and the knifie, and even straight razorie guy!

We got to his beautiful home in the Chicago suburbs, and walked into the very homely aroma of beef stew that was simmering on the stove. We quickly got down to business – vodka tonics and we started to prepare the vegetables for the evening’s meal. Chuck and I split up the veggies, and chose from several very well sharpened knives. When Chuck says he’s got a zoo at his house, he isn’t lying – there were children appearing and disappearing everywhere.

Chuck made the guacamole dip and started the BBQ, which would cook up 3 flank steaks that were doused in marinade. Next up were the margaritas, which made me feel like I was back in Mexico! Dinner ended up being steak fajitas with sautéed onions and peppers, guacamole, sour cream, and some cheese. I did indulge, and probably had a fajita or two too many…

After dinner, we headed down to the man-cave to do some serious sharpening. I brought Chuck back his Robeson razors, one of which needed to be honed up again, so we hooked up the microscope and started honing away on his Chosera Edge Pro stones. We simultaneously played with a couple of kitchen knives on the Kalamazoo, too! Midway through the fun, Jake, Chuck’s son (aka, the Marine), showed up with a friend and showed off a couple of guns from Chuck’s collection.  As most of us on the forum know, Jake recently safely returned from an 8month tour at a FOB in Afghanistan. It was a pleasure to finally meet him, shake his hand, and to thank him face to face. (There is no intended political comment here, just an honest appreciation for someone who risked his life for his country)

L-R: Jake, Friend, and Chuck

After Chuck successfully honed up his Robeson (it was now 1am!) he headed off to bed, while Jake showed me some pictures of his experience in Afghanistan. We ended up talking up a storm about all kinds of good things until 3:30am.

7am arrived pretty fast… I woke up to the smell of some freshly brewed coffee, and Chuck made an amazing frittata (what is it with the frittatas?) with peppers, onions and some cottage cheese, and a side of spicy sausage. I was beginning to wonder if I was on a knife sharpening tour or a gastronomical tour!

All too quickly, it was time to start heading out to the airport. Chuck and I had a wonderful knife-free conversation, discussing such “ordinary” things as education and parenting, showing how our hobbies can make friends out of us all.

Next up is the Operation O.B.O.E.  and the Bocal Majority’s Sharpening seminar.

😀

The Jende Book of Sharpening Double Hollow Ground Reed Knives

November 9, 2009

I just wanted to post a shameless plug for my reed knife sharpening book – The Jende Book of Sharpening Double Hollow Ground Reed Knives.

The book is based on my reed knife seminars, and teaches the same exact method that I use to sharpen every Jende Reed Knife. It walks you through the entire process with lots of color pictures and descriptions along the way. The first half of the book contains a lot of sharpening theory and information (including an illustrated glossary) and is a useful reference for any reed knife user. The second half of the book focuses on the sharpening itself, taking you step by step through the shaping, refining and polishing stages of sharpening, and includes detailed instructions and pictures for both right and left-handed knives.

This book is a must have for any reed knife user’s library.

COVER-4 150 height