Archive for the ‘Sharpening Stones’ Category

KME Sharpener Diamond Films by Jende 1″x4″

September 14, 2017

The KME Diamond Films by Jende bring yet another level of ability to the KME Sharpener! With the mainstream use of more abrasion resistant steels and ceramic blades, comes the need for something that will cut through everything. That would be diamonds. We’ve custom made the 1″x4″ Jende Diamond Films to fit the KME Sharpener with a 1/4″ acrylic base to create the proper thickness. These films can also be used for slip stones, wrapping around dowels for serrations, and whatever else you can think of!

The KME Diamond Films by Jende come in a wide range of grits, including 80, 60, 45, 30, 15, 9, 6, 3, 1, and 0.5 microns (from 220 grit to 30,000 grit!) with or without PSA backing. They are also available in 6 grit variety packs, or single grits of 5 pieces.

You can see our full line of KME Sharpener stones, strops, and films here.

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Jende Hapstone V6 Has Been Unleashed!

February 9, 2017

The Jende Hapstone V6 is now in stock! This is the first collaboration with Jende Industries and the Hapstone Sharpener. We’ve got the V6 sharpener tricked out with the Jende red and black colors, as well as a couple of other goodies.

jende-hapstone-1

One of the benefits of the Jende Hapstone V6 aside from its striking beauty, is the option to accessorize like mad – you can choose from a full line of Shapton Glass stones, Chosera stones, and from our complete line of Color-coded Jende Nanocloth Ultra Strops with CBN and Poly Diamond emulsions as well as our Kangaroo and Leather strops!

And if that was not enough, the Jende Hapstone V6 also has a rotary sharpening attachment, which clamps blades and rotates them without the need to move the knife at all!

hapstone-rotary-attachment

So if you’re in the market for a new sharpener. make it a Jende Hapstone V6!

 

Shapton Glass Stones for the Wicked Edge!

October 18, 2016

Shapton Glass Stones are now available for the Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener (WEPS)!  The full 10 stone lineup includes grits from 220 all the way up to 30K, and you can now make your own customized Shapton Glass Stone Paddles for the Wicked Edge.

Shapton Glass WEPS Stones

Shapton Glass WEPS Stones

The Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener is such a great platform, and anyone who uses one knows just how diverse the accessory stone options are. Shapton Glass Stones are some of the best sharpening stones in the known universe, and until now, the only only way to experience them was by using them in the full size stones. Now they have been brought together to make the WEPS even better! Be warned that there may be a small mushroom cloud that forms when you first use the stones 🙂

320 Shapton Glass WEPS Stone

The extensive grit range is unparalleled, and includes 220, 320, 500, 1K, 2K, 4K, 6K, 8K, 16K, and 30K grits. Our DIY Shapton Glass WEPS Paddles allow you to mix and match your grits to get the combos you need, and come attached to a Wicked Edge Paddle. If you liked the Wicked Edge before, you will fall in love with it all over again with the Shapton Glass WEPS Stones!

 

Loading and Using the Jende Nanocloth Ultra Color Coded Strops –

September 20, 2016

We’ve done a quick and dirty video on how to load your Jende Color Coded Nanocloth Ultra Strops. These are the 4 micron 2×6″ with 4 micron CBN Emulsion and the 210×70 mm 0.25 Micron Poly Diamond Emulsion. Both strops and emulsions are color matched for easy recognition. 210×70 mm strops are designed to fit most stone holders as well. These strops are 3/4″ thick acrylic.

A special thanks to Mike Martinez of Martinez Blades and to Mark Reich of Reich Precision for allowing their razor and knife to make a cameo appearance.

Jende Nanocloth Ultra Strops – Color Coded for Your Pleasure!

September 9, 2016

We are happy introduce Jende Nanocloth Ultra, our newest innovation in stropping mediums!

jende-nanocloth-rainbow-big

Jende Nanocloth Ultra Rainbow

  • The Jende Nanocloth Ultra is a synthetic stropping material that has no weave, so feedback is the same in all directions. Other weaved strops tend to have noticeable resistance change feedback variations, like a rug when vacuuming, which can make you second guess your stropping stroke.
  • The Honeycomb structure is very consistent. The shape allows the emulsions to fill up the honeycombs, keeping more abrasive on the strop and off your knife. The shape also fills up and beads on the surface, giving a snow-shoe effect with even scratches when stropping.
jende-black-nanocloth-plain-400x

Jende Nanocloth Ultra – 400x

  • The depth of the honeycomb has little compression – less than leather in general.
  •  Because of the depth of abrasive in the honeycomb tubes, differential pressure can be used to give the strop more or less aggression by adding pressure for more aggression, and super light strokes to just tickle the edge for finish stropping.
  • The color-coded Acrylic base allows you to instantly recognize the grit strop you desire to use, saving time and confusion.
  • Laser etched to ensure long-lasting and clear identification marks.
  • Works equally well with our Jende Poly Diamond Sprays, Jende Poly Diamond Emulsions, and our Jende CBN Emulsions.

We are offing a huge variety of sizes on color coded acrylic, including 210x70mm and 2×6″ Bench strops on 3/4″ thick acrylic blocks, and for a full array of guided sharpening systems, including the Edge Pro (EP), Hapstone Sharpener, KME Sharpener, and Wicked Edge (WEPS).  Stropping will never be the same again!

Breaking the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steel

October 23, 2015

Talk to anyone who has a conventional ceramic sharpening steel and they most likely will only let you look at it from a distance – which is dangerous enough in itself – and you’ll never get to use it, of course. That is because ceramic sharpening steels are notoriously fragile, and have taken on the same stigma as the famed Ford Pinto, whose gas tanks famously exploded on the slightest impact.

Well, let me tell you – our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels can take some of the meanest looks out there, and even hold back the tears when getting a good verbal lashing.  The anti-break technologies incorporated into the handle, the rod and the tip allow the Jende Ceramic Steels to take a good beating, too. We’ve done a previous “bam bam bam bam bam” test, which can be seen here, and now we have done an official drop test, showing that it is now safe for your friends to at least hold your ceramic steel, even if they are not worthy of using it!

Now, as much as we’d like to, we are not claiming the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels to be indestructible. They employ anti-break technologies that are designed to allow the steel to stay intact if dropped accidentally, or if bumped into another object, etc. during the rigors of everyday commercial and/or home use. For due diligence, we escalated our tests to see what exactly it would take to break one of our steels, and this was the last known surviving picture of the poor Jende Ceramic Steel that sacrificed its life in the name of science. His name was Brian, after the bastard that killed him.

jende ceramic steel

 

Jende Diamond Films vs. Tungsten Carbide Router Bits

June 29, 2015

We met up with our friend Greg the woodworker a couple months ago. He is actually very talented, and does a lot of testing and reviewing of new woodworking gadgets and tools for manufacturers. We got to talking about the sharpness and condition of his hand tools, and he took me up on an offer to sharpen up one of his chisels. Of course, I got a difficult one… Here’s the before and after pics.

Chisel Before

Chisel Before

Chisel After

Chisel After

With the success of my test by Greg, He promptly sent me a large pile of chisel and plane blades, some carbide tipped router bits, and a kitchen knife for good measure. The chisels and planes were easy enough, although they took some work. But the real challenge for me were the router bits. Carbide bits can only be sharpened with diamonds, and luckily I had some Jende Diamond Films on hand. It must be said that the Jende Diamond films are a general purpose film – and specifically in the case of these carbide bits, they are best suited for refreshing and conditioning the bits, and simply do not have the ability to remove or fix any chips. Most router bits cannot be repaired once chipped anyway due to the balance necessary for the bit to work and the usually tight overhang of the bit from its base.  But what can be done is the refreshing of the “corner” that the bit needs. Below are microscope pictures of the router bit edges, taken with a Veho 400 microscope. The actual size of the pictures are 1 mm wide by 0.75 mm high.

1. Before Dovetail

1. Before Dovetail

Picture 1 shows a dovetail router bit edge as it was received from Greg.  There is some roughness to the edge from use. The edge here is wavering. Since mechanized tools spin so quickly, ultimate refinement is not as important as creating a consistent shape of the edge as it impacts with the wood. Even though the Jende Diamond Films go as coarse as 80 micron (180 grit), I opted to begin with a 30 micron (500 grit)  film and finish with a 15 micron  (1,000 Grit) film. Because of the small size of the the bit, I used a 1/2″ wide piece of aluminum with some 6″ long PSA backed film that wrapped around the top of the aluminum to the other side, and basically made my own slip stone that would be easy to facilitate with the flatness of the dovetail bit as well as to manipulate around the curves of the cove bits. Here’s the picture of the slip stones after they crossed the finish line – 7 router bits later.

Diamond Slip Stones - After 7 Carbide Router Bits

Diamond Slip Stones – After 7 Carbide Router Bits

So by following the contours and angles of the bit, the 30 micron Jende diamond film packed an aggressive punch:

2. 30 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

2. 30 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

Not only are the scratches on the surface of the bit much finer, they are in the reverse direction. The edge of the edge is definitely much more “crisp” at this stage, with minimal chipping out at the edge as compared to picture 1. 30 micron is still pretty coarse in the grand scheme of things, and as mentioned before the shape is more important than the refinement. However, I usually take my mechanized edges up to 15 micron, or 1K. The 1K edge leaves a smoother finish, and the integrity of the edge stays intact better over time, IMO. Here’s the finished microscope shot:

3. 15 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

3. 15 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

The Jende Diamond Films can handle the carbide bits, and can give the edge another life or two.

Next up was a rather wide radius Cove bit. I did the same thing as the dovetail, only because of the rounded bit, I ran the slip stone along the curvature rather than running the bit across the surface of the film.

4. Before Cove

4. Before Cove

Notice the rounded edge of the edge. The Jende Diamond Films are perfect for taking the rounding out and refreshing the sharpness. Here’s the 30 micron results:

5. 30 micron Cove

5. 30 micron Cove

You can clearly see the original grinding lines that are perpendicular to the edge, and the 30 micron left to right scratches. Because of the rounded surface, it took a little longer to get the results I wished for. Also the carbide bits are slightly hollow ground from their original machining  processes, and my relatively flat slip stone needed to work a little more to get a nice radius on the edge. Picture 5a shows the result of the 30 micron film after just a little longer:

5a. 30 micron

5a. 30 micron

The original machining mark is quite noticeable now against the 30 micron scratches. The edge of the edge is also straight now. I finished with the 15 micron (1,000 grit) diamond film, and the results are quite similar to the dovetail’s, if not a little better 🙂

6. 15 micron

6. 15 micron

In conclusion, the Jende Diamond Films can handle carbide bits, and a whole lot more! One of the best features about these films is that with the PSA backing they can be used effectively as slip stones in almost any situation. The wide range of grits also allows for consistency from 80 micron (180 grit) all the way up to 0.5 micron (30,000 grit).

Here’s the finished bit:

Cove bit finished

Cove bit finished 1

Cove bit finished 2

Cove bit finished 2

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels under the Microscope

June 22, 2015

We wanted to document the speed and ability of our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels. Aside from having remarkable anti-break technologies in the tip and handles, they also actually work really well, as the microscope pictures will show. We freehand sharpened a couple of  Maestro Wu D-8 Nikiris (RC~58) from scratch and finished on both steels, and also demonstrated the speed of the steels by removing a chip on a customer’s custom Maestro Wu D-9 Damascus (RC~60). Pictures are with a Veho-400 USB Microscope, and the actual picture size is 1 mm wide by 0.75 mm high.

First, a picture of the steels – The white steel was difficult to see, so I also added a picture of a “dirty” section that had been used so the texture of the materials could be seen. Getting a picture of the black steel’s “dirty” section proved to be difficult as well. Basically, the surface of the steels is scaly looking, much like a reptile’s skin.

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels

White Steel clean

White Steel clean

White Steel dirty

White Steel dirty

 Black Steel Clean

Black Steel Clean

Black Steel Dirty

Black Steel Dirty

For new sharpening, I generally start with an #80 Grit belt, followed by a #240 Grit belt, and follow with a #1,500 Shapton Pro stone. This is my “basic sharp”, and it will shave hair and juuust push cut. The picture below is the edge off the #240 belt, which is jagged, and usually has a significant burr, which is pictured in the picture below that.

1. 240 Belt A

1. 240 Belt A

 

2. 240 Belt B

2. 240 Belt B – notice the gem-like burr

I then cleaned up the edge on the #1,500 Shapton Pro stone, roughly 35 back and forth passes per side, followed by a series of about 15 single-sided strokes:

3. 1500 Pro A

3. 1500 Pro A

You can clearly see a micro bevel from the stropping strokes vs. the knife strokes. This is pretty much the result of using less pressure with single-sided strokes, and it helps put the apex on the edge of the edge. While some haters may have something to say about my lack of precision, in reality the micro bevel is only 0.04 mm high – meaning my variation is pretty darn low. What matters most is that my stropping/steeling strokes are consistent, which they are.

3a. 1500 Pro A Measured Variation

3a. 1500 Pro A Measured Variation

After the 1,500 Shapton Pro, I did 10 light, alternating strokes on the Jende White Ceramic Sharpening Steel:

5. White Steel A  x10

5. White Steel A x10

The result shows a noticeable increase in reflection at the edge of the edge, indicating some cutting/burnishing action. The apex of the edge has evened out a touch, but is still quite similar to the edge from the just the stone. The cutting test determined that the edge was more aggressive than that straight off the #1,500 Shapton Pro stone. The White Steel cut very quickly and aggressively, which is the way it’s meant to.

I then sharpened up a different D-8 on the belts followed by the #1,500 stone in the same fashion, and then went straight to the Black Steel and did 10 light, alternating strokes:

7. Black Steel A x10

7. Black Steel A x10

As my micro bevel shows, I am pretty consistent from knife to knife. But back to the point – the difference here from picture 3 above shows noticeable cutting/burnishing of the bevel, but less than that found in picture 5 from the White Steel – which is the way things are supposed to happen. More importantly, the edge of the edge smooths out, and the cutting test produced a practically indistinguishable result from the #1,500 Shapton Stone. That’s friggin’ impressive because my results off the #1,500 Shapton Pro are very difficult to beat. 😀

For the next trick, I used a customer’s D-9 Damascus (RC~60) that came in for sharpening. There was a nice little chip in the edge which would’ve been easy enough to remove on the stones and belts, but I wanted to see how many licks it would take with the steel to get to the center of this chip. I also measured the “gap” along the way. Here is the “before picture”, and the same picture below it with the measurement of the width of the chip:

10a. Chip Before

10a. Chip Before

10. Chip Before

10. Chip Before

Then, with 10 strokes of the White Steel: I used what I would call an aggressive amount of pressure since I knew I was trying to fix the chip. Again, the picture followed by the same picture with the measurement. The chip which initially took up the majority of the screen width at 0.77 mm, was now only 0.46 mm – generously. The deepest part of the chip was about only half of that.

11a. Chip white steel x10

11a. Chip white steel x10

11. Chip white steel x10

11. Chip white steel x10

 

Then I did 10 more aggressive strokes on the White Steel, bringing it up to 20 strokes. Only the deepest part of the original chip remained, with a width of only 0.24 mm.

12a. Chip white steel x20

12a. Chip white steel x20

12. Chip white steel x20

12. Chip white steel x20

 

I followed this with a third round of strokes, bringing the total up to 30. There was no real evidence of the chip left at this point. I looked up and down the blade for any other indications of the chip, and there were none.

13. Chip white steel x30

13. Chip white steel x30

In keeping with the mentality of these steels, the White (Mohs 9) is the aggressive steel while the Black (Mohs 8) is the finishing steel. I then took 10 light, alternating strokes on the Black Steel.

 

14. Black Steel Final x10

14. Black Steel Final x10

I’d say this looks pretty freakin’ good! At a macro level, you can visibly see the micro bevel from the steeling (picture size is 13 mm wide by 9.75 mm high, and the actual micro bevel is approx. 0.22 mm wide). And because of the geometry behind the edge is still established and intact, the knife actually still cuts very smoothly despite it not being a 5K edge anymore.

15. D-9 Macro Black Steel Final

15. D-9 Macro Black Steel Final

Overall, the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Black and White steels can do quite an amazing job of maintaining knives – and can even handle small chips. More importantly, when used in conjunction with one another, they can help your knife maintain its edge for an extended period of time before needing a full resharpening.

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels – Black and White Ceramic Rods

June 9, 2015

We are proud to announce our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels! They come in white ceramic (Mohs 9) and black ceramic (Mohs 8), and feature anti-break technologies in the handles and tips.

….and for those who have broken their ceramic steels with the slightest touch in the past – check this test out!

Knife steels are a staple found in almost every chef’s knife kit, but not much is known about the different kinds of sharpening steels out there. The Jende White Steel is triple fired, which hardens the ceramic material to Mohs 9. This added hardness is ideal for maintaining knives made with softer steels, and can be used for more aggressive steeling action.

The Jende Black Steel is double fired, which blackens the ceramic material and hardens it to Mohs 8. This hardness and density is ideal for maintaining knives with harder steels, and is an excellent finishing steel for quick touch-ups on the go.

The advantage to using ceramic steels over metal or diamond is the overall edge that is produced. Metal sharpening steels either bend an edge back into position without abrading (which is not necessarily bad in the short term), or rip the steel from the edge of the knife, substantially lowering the overall sharpness of the edge, not to mention making it very weak (which is just plain bad).

Diamond sharpening steels will abrade everything, but can be a little too aggressive if you’re not careful. This is good for aggressive maintenance, but for touching up an edge, it can quickly erode the initial edge geometry. Depending on the fineness of the diamond steel, it may also be diminishing the overall sharpness, and/or leaving a serrated edge.

The Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels are designed with the idea that steels are used to maintain an edge in between sharpening. The Mohs 8 and 9 hardness of the steels work quickly and effectively, minimizing the loss of edge geometry while keeping the overall sharpness level intact. When using the Jende Sharpening Steels, it is recommended that your edge be sharpened between 1,000 and 3,000 grit .

Diamond Bars by Ken Schwartz – For Buffers

November 17, 2014

We’re happy to announce that we now have Diamond Bars from Ken Schwartz! These specially formulated diamond bars are packed full of diamond abrasive, making them very fast, and very consistent. They also come in a wide range of grits – from 80 micron down to 0.10 micron! So if you’re removing rust from a blade, repairing chips, profiling or reprofiling, sharpening, or polishing the blade, these bars are essential.