Archive for the ‘Edge Pro Stones’ Category

1K King Stones for the Edge Pro, Hapstone, and TSPROF Sharpeners

September 17, 2017

Jende Industries is now carrying a 1″ x 6″ King Stone 1K grit for the Edge Pro, Hapstone, and TSPROF Sharpeners! One of the beautiful things about the guided systems such as the Edge Pro, Hapstone, and TS Prof, is that they all utilize 1″ x 6″ stones, which is our specialty!

The 1K King Stone is an old warhorse stone that is prized for its overall quality at a very economical price. It acts as an aoto stone, removing more aggressive scratches left by diamond plates, and coarser scratches left by coarser stones, leaving a very good working edge. It also has some cutting power, and can be used for minor repairs and general maintenance.

The King 1K stone measures 1″ x 6″ x 1/4″ thick and comes mounted to a standard aluminum blank that will affix into any Edge Pro, Hapstone, or TS Prof sharpener. They do require a pre soak before use, and are used with water.

#jendeindustries #edgepro #KMEsharpener #TSPROF #Hapstone #King1K #Kingstone

 

 

 

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Jende Nanocloth Ultra Strops – Color Coded for Your Pleasure!

September 9, 2016

We are happy introduce Jende Nanocloth Ultra, our newest innovation in stropping mediums!

jende-nanocloth-rainbow-big

Jende Nanocloth Ultra Rainbow

  • The Jende Nanocloth Ultra is a synthetic stropping material that has no weave, so feedback is the same in all directions. Other weaved strops tend to have noticeable resistance change feedback variations, like a rug when vacuuming, which can make you second guess your stropping stroke.
  • The Honeycomb structure is very consistent. The shape allows the emulsions to fill up the honeycombs, keeping more abrasive on the strop and off your knife. The shape also fills up and beads on the surface, giving a snow-shoe effect with even scratches when stropping.
jende-black-nanocloth-plain-400x

Jende Nanocloth Ultra – 400x

  • The depth of the honeycomb has little compression – less than leather in general.
  •  Because of the depth of abrasive in the honeycomb tubes, differential pressure can be used to give the strop more or less aggression by adding pressure for more aggression, and super light strokes to just tickle the edge for finish stropping.
  • The color-coded Acrylic base allows you to instantly recognize the grit strop you desire to use, saving time and confusion.
  • Laser etched to ensure long-lasting and clear identification marks.
  • Works equally well with our Jende Poly Diamond Sprays, Jende Poly Diamond Emulsions, and our Jende CBN Emulsions.

We are offing a huge variety of sizes on color coded acrylic, including 210x70mm and 2×6″ Bench strops on 3/4″ thick acrylic blocks, and for a full array of guided sharpening systems, including the Edge Pro (EP), Hapstone Sharpener, KME Sharpener, and Wicked Edge (WEPS).  Stropping will never be the same again!

Razor Honing with Jende Diamond Films

November 14, 2014

The new Jende Diamond Films are great for honing razors. I personally use the 1″x6″ size with PSA for all my razors, but you can use larger sizes, with or without PSA backing just as well! Here I go through the 45, 30, 15, 9, 6, 3, 1, and 0.5 micron films. For most razor applications, I recommend the Polishing Set from our website, which is the 15, 9, 6, 3, 1, 0.5 micron films (1K through 30K).

Jende Diamond Films – Using PSA and Non PSA

November 12, 2014

Our new diamond films come with the option of being PSA backed or non-PSA backed, and this video gives a quick how-to about securing your non-PSA film to a surface, and how to change the PSA backed film. This is on the 1″x6″ Edge Pro size films, but the methods will work on all sizes.

Diamond Films by Jende Industries

November 10, 2014

Abrasion resistant steels and ceramic knives are now an established part of the knife and tool world, and this requires diamonds in order sharpen them effectively. That’s why we are proud to introduce Diamond Sharpening Films by Jende Industries! We have 10 grits available, ranging from 80 microns to 0.5 microns (180 grit to 30,000 grit), and come in Wicked Edge Precision Sharpener (WEPS) size, Edge Pro size (1″x6″), 2″x6″, 3″x8″ and 3″x11″. They are also available with PSA and non-PSA backing.

2x6 jende standard set web

2″x6″ Diamond Films by Jende Industries

With a grit range that rivals that of some of the best sharpening stone series out there, our diamond films can handle profiling and repairs while bringing your edges to amazing heights of sharpness. Our films are also great for slip stone applications – they can be wrapped around dowels for sharpening serrated edges or the inside curvatures of turning tools, or used to polish the blade of old razors.

We’ve put together a few diamond film sets to choose from in order to get you started:

The Polishing Set includes one piece each of 15, 9, 6, 3, 1, and 0.5 micron films (1K to 30K grit), and is a comprehensive set that is geared toward general edge maintenance and regular repair work. Straight Razor honers will benefit greatly from this set, and those looking for shave ready knife edges will definitely impress!

The Standard Set includes one piece each of 45, 30, 15, 9, 6, and 3 micron films (320 to 6K grit), and is an “all around” set that can handle profiling and reasonable repairs. The 3 micron finish produces a mirror finish, and is “good enough” for most knife and tool applications.

The Coarse Set includes one piece each of 80, 60, 45, 30, 15, and 9 micron films (180 to 1,500 grit). This coarse set is meant for some more serious work, be it cleaning up scratches from belts or diamond plates, or for removing chips or reprofiling. The 9 micron film leaves a great “working sharp” edge that will hold up to abuse, and still do some serious cutting.

Setting a Straight Razor Bevel on a 1K Chosera EP Stone (Video)

March 14, 2014

I was asked to show the best way to set a bevel on a 1K stone, in particular on a Chosera 1″x6″ Edge Pro sized stone. FWIW, I do the majority of my razor honing on 1×6 stones because the 1″ width can easily accommodate most warping, frowning, and smiling blades better than a full sized 3″ width stone can. It’s a personal thing for me, as I have all the corresponding full sized stones as well, but for others, it is also a space and money thing.

Anyway, there are 3 basic strokes demonstrated in the video: Circles, Knife Strokes, and X-Strokes. There is a synopsis below the video. Enjoy!

Circles – are the most aggressive action, and are best for repairing chips or creating an initial bevel on a razor that is in need of serious restoration. I generally do sets of 20-25 circles per side with pressure. It may take many sets to do what needs to be done, but this is the stroke to get that work done. Once a bevel is established using circles, it will need to be refined with knife strokes on the same stone before moving to a finer stone.

Knife Strokes – are single sided back and forth strokes made without turning the blade over. It is “half an X stroke”. This stroke is best for light repair, or a quick refresh of a tired edge that has been maintained for a while. It uses less pressure than the circle stroke, and cleans up the messy edge the circles make. I generally do sets of 20-25 strokes per side. You shouldn’t need too many sets to accomplish your goal here if you’ve used circles, but if you start here, it may take several sets.

X-Strokes – are the usual method of alternating, single side honing strokes, and uses no pressure. This is the least invasive method, and the one that prepares the bevel/edge for the next grit level. I recommend at least 50-100 strokes to firmly establish the depth and consistency of the 1K stone. This will help prevent micro chipping at higher levels.

When to use each stroke?

If your razor is an Ebay special, or has serious restoration issues, then you will want to start with circles, clean up with knife strokes and then finish with the X-strokes – all on the 1K stone.

If you are maintaining a tired shaving edge with maintenance wear, I would begin with the X-Strokes, and if more aggression is needed, move to the Knife Stroke, and if it is really bad, resort to the Circles (and then work you way back up).

I hope this helps!

The Edge Pro and Taiwan’s Coast Guard

November 24, 2012

There aren’t too many Edge Pro users here in Taiwan, and I was quite surprised when I received an inquiry from Mr. Randy Chen asking about some of the Ken Schwartz Diamond Films for the Edge Pro. I immediately called him up to discuss his questions, and found out that he is a career officer serving in the Taiwan Coast Guard, and while he is stationed in Taipei, he is originally from Kaohsiung city. I extended an invitation for him to come over to my workshop the next time he visited Kaohsiung. As luck would have it, he was coming down to Kaohsiung for a ceremony, and our schedules worked out where we were could meet up and play with some of the Edge Pro stones!

Randy likes and collects folding knives as a hobby, and has gotten into sharpening and maintaining them as a way to reduce stress and relax. He doesn’t use them “on the job”  since he is on the administration side of things with the coast guard. He purchased an Edge Pro, and since the steels in his knife collection are varied, he was looking for something more versatile than the stock EP stones.

Randy made it to the workshop, set up his Edge Pro, and we profiled a new knife (sorry, I forgot the name and the steel type). We started off with the Atoma 140 plate, which made quick work of establishing the bevel on both sides of the knife. I chose the Atoma 140 over the 125 or 165 micron diamond papers because while both products are diamond abrasives, the Atoma plates are more aggressive due to the raised clusters of diamonds in a very controlled grid pattern which scratch deeper. Conversely, the more “matted” texture of the films will prevent chipping on more brittle steels, and do an excellent job of cleaning up the deeper scratches from the diamond plates.

From the Atoma 140, we jumped to the 74 micron diamond film. Randy was completely impressed with just how fast the Atoma 140 scratches were removed and the 74 micron scratches established. They are also quite uniform, and even though the edge is still rather unrefined (74 micron = approx #200 JIS), it was almost work sharp. That’s the major advantage to using guided sharpening – you get very sharp knives very early in the game because the shape of the edge is established so consistently and because the texture of the films won’t scratch as deep.

After the 74 micron film, we jumped to the 30 micron film (approx #500 JIS). We could’ve jumped to an even finer grit from the 74 micron, but Randy wanted more perfection in his progression. Once again, the 30 micron scratches were quickly established and I would call this knife work sharp, even though work sharp is generally considered 1K-2K JIS.  Then on to the 20 micron ( approx. #800 JIS). Honestly, the knife could’ve stopped here, but we took it to the 9 micron (approx. #1,500 JIS).  Randy was more and more impressed at each level of refinement, and his edge looked fantastic, and was easily shaving arm hair. For fun, and since our time was limited, we did a quick 5 strokes on the 0.5 micron CBN to give the edge of the edge just a little more “umpfh”.

Randy’s knife was never sharper! 😀

Unfortunately our time ran out, and Randy had to leave – but it’s good to know that Randy is now proudly serving his country with sharp knives at the ready!

Finding Your Sharpening Philosophy

November 3, 2012

There is a HUGE range and variety of sharpening products and methods out there, and before going any further down the sharpening rabbit hole, forming  a sharpening philosophy can help you save time and money in the long run.

When you first embark on your sharpening journey and start sifting through the usual pile of information that search engines, Youtube videos, forums, and blogs (like this one! ) spew out, it can be very overwhelming. In reality, there are only two constants when sharpening: the first is that the answer to every question is It depends; and the second is that The more you know about sharpening, the more you need to know.

The next logical question is What do I need to know? Well, the answer is, of course It depends! I’m glad we got that cleared up. 😀

Seriously, though, it’s not about answering “how to sharpen” (which is the easy part since the actual rules of sharpening are quite concrete) – it’s about asking and answering What do I want to achieve when I sharpen, and how do I go about it? The answers to these 2 questions are what form the backbones of your sharpening philosophy, and will guide you toward making purchases that are best for you.

The first major categories to think about are these:

  1. Speed vs. Cost vs. Precision
  2. Mechanized vs. Manual Sharpening
  3. Guided vs. Freehand Sharpening
  4. Maintenance vs. Full Service Sharpening

There are more categories to choose from as you progress deeper down certain paths, but these are the most important factors in the beginning.

  • Speed vs. Cost vs. Precision

The saying goes “Good, fast and cheap – Pick any 2”. Speed generally costs more, as do more precise results. However, if you are on a budget, less expensive products will still generally work. This is the is one major category that every decision will always boil down to. There is no “wrong” answer – it is completely subjective, and the answer can change at any time given the circumstances surrounding the decision(s).

Take a more in-depth look at cost vs. speed vs. precision here.

The second category will more clearly define the path of your sharpening journey:

  • Mechanized vs. Manual Sharpening

There is a definite split in the sharpening world between Mechanized and Manual sharpening. Both have many options to choose from, and both have their  pros and cons depending on the type of sharpening you are doing, and sharpeners can find a comfortable balance between them. Generally speaking, mechanized is anything with a motor – a belt sander, stone or paper wheel, grinders, etc., and are easily the fastest methods and are more aggressive than non-mechanized approaches.

Manual Sharpening is further broken down into Freehand and Guided sharpening, which are similar in terms of the types of sharpening mediums they use. They include sharpening stones, various abrasive papers, sprays, compounds, and stropping mediums, etc.. (More on this in a minute.) But overall, Manual Sharpening’s speed is slower, but results are generally more personalized and the process is more Zen-like.

So once you’ve decided where you stand in terms of Mechanized vs. Manual Sharpening, you will need to go one step further:

  • Freehand vs. Guided

With Freehand vs. Guided Sharpening, there is the obvious increase in precision with guides that makes them very powerful and almost idiot proof sharpening tools, however, the speed, skill and freedom of freehand sharpening has a large appeal as well. Note that both Mechanized and Manual sharpening can done freehand, or guided with various jigs and guides.

The final category to consider is:

  • Maintenance vs. Full Service Sharpening

In this case, Maintenance Sharpening is for someone who has several knives that are kept consistently sharp, and would like to simply touch them up here and there, with no real damage to repair or major sharpening to be done. Full Service Sharpening is being able to perform all aspects of sharpening from making repairs to chipped edges, profiling new blades, and maintaining edges over time.

This is not a black and white category – there is an overlap of abilities with many of the products and methods. Most Maintenance-minded sharpening products and methods will perform repair tasks, and Full Service-minded sharpening products and methods are perfectly suitable for maintaining edges.

Conclusion

If you’ve taken these 4 categories into consideration, you should start to have a better view of what kind of sharpening you want to do, and which products and methods you may want to consider given the specific things you want to sharpen.

Your philosophy is not set in stone – it will change and develop as you continue on your journey  – don’t forget – the more you know about sharpening, the more you need to know. For example, there are more advanced categories to consider, such as sharpening for Aesthetics vs. Functionality, “True grit” edges vs. Polished Grooves – just to name 2.

Remember – It Depends!

Diamond Sharpening Films by Ken Schwartz – in 1×6, 2×6 and 3×8

September 14, 2012

With the ever increasing development of the super abrasion-resistant exotic Uber-Steels in the knife world, conventional sharpening stones are being pushed to their limits, and Ken Schwartz has come to the rescue with his Diamond Sharpening Films.

Almost everyone has a DMT and/or an Atoma diamond plate, but these are super aggressive plates that are great for heavy duty repair and profiling work. For the most part, they tap out at #1,200, or 7 micron, and even although DMT has a 3 micron plate, it isn’t nearly as popular as the lower grits. Traditionally, if you wanted more refinement, switching over to diamond pastes was the answer, but as we’ve been finding, pastes generally don’t have nearly as much “punch” as the plates. This is due to the overall lack of abrasive concentration, and the fact that while the size of the abrasives are consistent, the depth of scratches from the plates are much deeper than those from the pastes.

So the problem lies in finding an all-diamond progression, on a consistent medium, AND with a huge range of grits. Ken Schwartz has found that solution with his diamond films on Float Glass, which range from a whopping 165 micron (100 grit) to 0.1 micron (150,000 grit!). Not only that, it’s currently available in several sizes: 1″ x 6″ for the Edge Pro, 2″ x 6″, and a “full size” 3″ x 8″. They can be custom ordered to size as well. 😀

I have a couple of Uber-steel knives, including a Rex-121 Mule from Farid, but we all know diamonds can sharpen anything, including ceramic knives, so I opted for what would make the best microscope pictures – a straight razor. In this case it’s a vintage Torrey Wedge.  Besides, you don’t need super hard steel in order to opt for diamond sharpening. 🙂  The pictures were all taken with a Veho-400x USB scope and actual size of the pictures is .75 mm tall by 1 mm wide.

Since the Torrey was already in good shaving condition, I did not need to step back to the 165 micron diamond sharpening film, and opted instead to begin with the 45 micron (320 grit) to re-establish the bevel. I used the 1″ x 6″ Edge Pro size since it makes dealing with warps and other razor-related issues. In fact, I pretty much exclusively use the 1×6 size for honing razors.

1 Torrey 45 Micron Diamond

Torrey 45 Micron Diamond

From the 45 micron film, we can see an edge comparable to the #320 Shapton Pro – a little serrated, but quite consistent.

From here, I progressed to the 30 micron (500 grit) film.

2 Torrey 30 Micron Diamond

2 Torrey 30 Micron Diamond

30 micron (500 grit) is still quite coarse in terms of razors, but the edge of the edge is already starting to clean up.

Next is the 20 micron (800 grit) film.

3 Torrey 20 Micron Diamond

3 Torrey 20 Micron Diamond

Again, 20 micron (800 grit) is still quite coarse (and for razors is probably the coarsest grit needed, if at all), but things are looking quite nice. This would be acceptable for a working edge on a knife.

Then onto the 9 micron (1,500 grit) film.

5 Torrey 9 Micron Diamond

5 Torrey 9 Micron Diamond

I’m completely impressed with the 9 micron film. The edge is looking clean, and the scratches are much more consistent with water stones than diamond plates.

6 micron (3K grit)  is next.

6 Torrey 6 Micron Diamond

6 Torrey 6 Micron Diamond

As we can see from the difference in the reflective lighting on the bevel, we have entered into the “critical leap” area of the films. There is definite polishing happening at this stage, so we can say the critical leap is between the 9 micron and 6 micron. However, I personally feel it’s between the 6 micron and 3 micron (6K), as we will see below.

7 Torrey 3 Micron Diamond

7 Torrey 3 Micron Diamond

The reason I would rather call the 6 to 3 micron the critical leap is because of the sheer “flatness” of the bevel off the 3 micron. Either way, at this point we are certainly sharp, and headed toward the land of shaving!

The 1 micron (15K) film is next.

8 Torrey 1 Micron Diamond

8 Torrey 1 Micron Diamond

Although the edge of the edge is certainly consistent and able to shave,  we begin to run into some razor-related issues. This picture is reminiscent of the 16K Shapton Glass post I did a while back, where the Swedish steel was quite brittle, and began to chip out as the steel got thinned beyond it’s capability. That has much more to do with the characteristics of the steel, and NOT the quality of the diamond films.

9 Torrey half Micron Diamond

9 Torrey half Micron Diamond

Here we can see the 0.5 micron (30K grit) film is pushing the limits of the Torrey, however,  the bevel itself is quite clean.

Since I was also testing a progression of Ken Schwartz’s diamond sharpening films for a razor customer, I switched here to finish the razor on Ken Schwartz’s 0.125 micron CBN on balsa instead of going to the 0.1 diamond film, as was requested.

Conclusion

Obviously, the diamond films work, and they deliver in full from coarse to ultra fine grits. You also don’t need super hard steels in order to use or benefit from the diamond films, and since we are dealing with diamond abrasives, you get much longer cutting action out of them than conventional sand paper. Ken Schwartz has hit a home run in my book!

By the way, the shave was wonderful 🙂

Jende Industries, LLC 2012 Sharpening Party!

July 19, 2012

After a short 2 day break from my travels to Chicago and Austin, it was finally time for my Sharpening Party! Ken Schwartz from Precise Sharpening flew in the previous evening, and we had a chance to catch up again – after only 2 weeks since seeing each other at the BLADE show in Atlanta 😀 Greg (Dudly the togi from the knife forums), John Fortune (Hone Ranger), and Ron Swartz of KME Sharpeners arrived with lots of goodies in tow! Greg brought his sword polishing station, complete with stones and a couple of Katanas, John brought the all important Arizona Iced Tea along with a few sharpening goodies, and Ron brought his KME Sharpener with about 20 different accessory stones, including the new Choseras.

Having Ken, Ron, John and Greg would’ve easily been more than enough for an all day sharpening “meeting of the minds,” but we took this party to an all new level – we went international, baby! That’s right, we hooked up our laptops and had Skype video calls from Belgium with Michiel Vanhoudt from Belgian Sharpening, and Jens Skandevall (our famous – and crazy – shaving competition winner) from Sweden.
And this was completely interactive – Jens and Michiel were honing razors in front of each other (we turned the computers toward themselves 😀 ), Michiel gave Ron a Belgian coticule/BBW tutorial, and then we all watched with complete amazement while Greg blew our minds with his sword polishing demo, which took us all too quickly through just about the entire process (obviously not on the entire sword, which would take over a week).

International Skype Call

Greg’s Katana Polishing Demo

We were in the garage for the sword polishing demo for about 2 hours before we decided to head inside for some much needed AC!

Once inside, the fun continued – we brought Michiel and Jens in with us, and we all continued to sharpen stuff – Ron broke out his EDC, clamped it into the KME sharpener, and we documented the entire Chosera series on the KME on the microscope. Ken started bringing out all kinds of Nubatama stones – Japanese naturals and synthetics – for Greg to play with, and John started in on a Maestro Wu folding knife with the Atoma diamond plates for the Edge pro. I played with a few EP stones that John brought and generously gifted to me. Jens started sharpening some knives while Michiel honed up a razor or two. This was just too much fun!

L-R: Greg, John, Ken, Ron

Geeking out with the loupes and microscopes!

The fun continued until about 5pm, when we took a dinner break. This was a 7 hour marathon, and Michiel and Jens lasted over 5 hours with us, and John had to head home to his family ( a few hours later than anticipated!). Since Ron took Ken and me out to the Longhorn steakhouse a few weeks earlier, we decided to return the favor.

After the wonderful steak dinner, Greg took off, and Ron, Ken and I returned to the kitchen to sharpen even more. This time, Ken broke out his famed CBN sprays on Balsa, and put them on Ron’s KME Sharpener. I must say, that CBN is totally awesome, and it works so much faster than you would think given it’s just a spritz or two on the balsa! We continued the sharpening madness until around 11pm, a full 13 hours since we started.

It was really great to spend time with John and Greg again, and for Michiel and Jens to watch us patiently for so long (even though they were included in on the conversations). This was the first real significant amount of time Ken and I got to spend with Ron since he picked up the Choseras for the KME, and I must say, we all got along grandly. What was most amazing about this party was the fact that we all sharpened only 1 knife the entire day – not because we were slow, but because we were able to take the time to discuss and explore things in depth, rather than having to bang out a bunch of knives like we would at a trade show or convention.

What a great sharpening party!