Jende Diamond Films vs. Tungsten Carbide Router Bits

June 29, 2015

We met up with our friend Greg the woodworker a couple months ago. He is actually very talented, and does a lot of testing and reviewing of new woodworking gadgets and tools for manufacturers. We got to talking about the sharpness and condition of his hand tools, and he took me up on an offer to sharpen up one of his chisels. Of course, I got a difficult one… Here’s the before and after pics.

Chisel Before

Chisel Before

Chisel After

Chisel After

With the success of my test by Greg, He promptly sent me a large pile of chisel and plane blades, some carbide tipped router bits, and a kitchen knife for good measure. The chisels and planes were easy enough, although they took some work. But the real challenge for me were the router bits. Carbide bits can only be sharpened with diamonds, and luckily I had some Jende Diamond Films on hand. It must be said that the Jende Diamond films are a general purpose film – and specifically in the case of these carbide bits, they are best suited for refreshing and conditioning the bits, and simply do not have the ability to remove or fix any chips. Most router bits cannot be repaired once chipped anyway due to the balance necessary for the bit to work and the usually tight overhang of the bit from its base.  But what can be done is the refreshing of the “corner” that the bit needs. Below are microscope pictures of the router bit edges, taken with a Veho 400 microscope. The actual size of the pictures are 1 mm wide by 0.75 mm high.

1. Before Dovetail

1. Before Dovetail

Picture 1 shows a dovetail router bit edge as it was received from Greg.  There is some roughness to the edge from use. The edge here is wavering. Since mechanized tools spin so quickly, ultimate refinement is not as important as creating a consistent shape of the edge as it impacts with the wood. Even though the Jende Diamond Films go as coarse as 80 micron (180 grit), I opted to begin with a 30 micron (500 grit)  film and finish with a 15 micron  (1,000 Grit) film. Because of the small size of the the bit, I used a 1/2″ wide piece of aluminum with some 6″ long PSA backed film that wrapped around the top of the aluminum to the other side, and basically made my own slip stone that would be easy to facilitate with the flatness of the dovetail bit as well as to manipulate around the curves of the cove bits. Here’s the picture of the slip stones after they crossed the finish line – 7 router bits later.

Diamond Slip Stones - After 7 Carbide Router Bits

Diamond Slip Stones – After 7 Carbide Router Bits

So by following the contours and angles of the bit, the 30 micron Jende diamond film packed an aggressive punch:

2. 30 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

2. 30 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

Not only are the scratches on the surface of the bit much finer, they are in the reverse direction. The edge of the edge is definitely much more “crisp” at this stage, with minimal chipping out at the edge as compared to picture 1. 30 micron is still pretty coarse in the grand scheme of things, and as mentioned before the shape is more important than the refinement. However, I usually take my mechanized edges up to 15 micron, or 1K. The 1K edge leaves a smoother finish, and the integrity of the edge stays intact better over time, IMO. Here’s the finished microscope shot:

3. 15 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

3. 15 micron Jende Diamond Film Dovetail

The Jende Diamond Films can handle the carbide bits, and can give the edge another life or two.

Next up was a rather wide radius Cove bit. I did the same thing as the dovetail, only because of the rounded bit, I ran the slip stone along the curvature rather than running the bit across the surface of the film.

4. Before Cove

4. Before Cove

Notice the rounded edge of the edge. The Jende Diamond Films are perfect for taking the rounding out and refreshing the sharpness. Here’s the 30 micron results:

5. 30 micron Cove

5. 30 micron Cove

You can clearly see the original grinding lines that are perpendicular to the edge, and the 30 micron left to right scratches. Because of the rounded surface, it took a little longer to get the results I wished for. Also the carbide bits are slightly hollow ground from their original machining  processes, and my relatively flat slip stone needed to work a little more to get a nice radius on the edge. Picture 5a shows the result of the 30 micron film after just a little longer:

5a. 30 micron

5a. 30 micron

The original machining mark is quite noticeable now against the 30 micron scratches. The edge of the edge is also straight now. I finished with the 15 micron (1,000 grit) diamond film, and the results are quite similar to the dovetail’s, if not a little better :)

6. 15 micron

6. 15 micron

In conclusion, the Jende Diamond Films can handle carbide bits, and a whole lot more! One of the best features about these films is that with the PSA backing they can be used effectively as slip stones in almost any situation. The wide range of grits also allows for consistency from 80 micron (180 grit) all the way up to 0.5 micron (30,000 grit).

Here’s the finished bit:

Cove bit finished

Cove bit finished 1

Cove bit finished 2

Cove bit finished 2

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels under the Microscope

June 22, 2015

We wanted to document the speed and ability of our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels. Aside from having remarkable anti-break technologies in the tip and handles, they also actually work really well, as the microscope pictures will show. We freehand sharpened a couple of  Maestro Wu D-8 Nikiris (RC~58) from scratch and finished on both steels, and also demonstrated the speed of the steels by removing a chip on a customer’s custom Maestro Wu D-9 Damascus (RC~60). Pictures are with a Veho-400 USB Microscope, and the actual picture size is 1 mm wide by 0.75 mm high.

First, a picture of the steels – The white steel was difficult to see, so I also added a picture of a “dirty” section that had been used so the texture of the materials could be seen. Getting a picture of the black steel’s “dirty” section proved to be difficult as well. Basically, the surface of the steels is scaly looking, much like a reptile’s skin.

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels

Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels

White Steel clean

White Steel clean

White Steel dirty

White Steel dirty

 Black Steel Clean

Black Steel Clean

Black Steel Dirty

Black Steel Dirty

For new sharpening, I generally start with an #80 Grit belt, followed by a #240 Grit belt, and follow with a #1,500 Shapton Pro stone. This is my “basic sharp”, and it will shave hair and juuust push cut. The picture below is the edge off the #240 belt, which is jagged, and usually has a significant burr, which is pictured in the picture below that.

1. 240 Belt A

1. 240 Belt A

 

2. 240 Belt B

2. 240 Belt B – notice the gem-like burr

I then cleaned up the edge on the #1,500 Shapton Pro stone, roughly 35 back and forth passes per side, followed by a series of about 15 single-sided strokes:

3. 1500 Pro A

3. 1500 Pro A

You can clearly see a micro bevel from the stropping strokes vs. the knife strokes. This is pretty much the result of using less pressure with single-sided strokes, and it helps put the apex on the edge of the edge. While some haters may have something to say about my lack of precision, in reality the micro bevel is only 0.04 mm high – meaning my variation is pretty darn low. What matters most is that my stropping/steeling strokes are consistent, which they are.

3a. 1500 Pro A Measured Variation

3a. 1500 Pro A Measured Variation

After the 1,500 Shapton Pro, I did 10 light, alternating strokes on the Jende White Ceramic Sharpening Steel:

5. White Steel A  x10

5. White Steel A x10

The result shows a noticeable increase in reflection at the edge of the edge, indicating some cutting/burnishing action. The apex of the edge has evened out a touch, but is still quite similar to the edge from the just the stone. The cutting test determined that the edge was more aggressive than that straight off the #1,500 Shapton Pro stone. The White Steel cut very quickly and aggressively, which is the way it’s meant to.

I then sharpened up a different D-8 on the belts followed by the #1,500 stone in the same fashion, and then went straight to the Black Steel and did 10 light, alternating strokes:

7. Black Steel A x10

7. Black Steel A x10

As my micro bevel shows, I am pretty consistent from knife to knife. But back to the point – the difference here from picture 3 above shows noticeable cutting/burnishing of the bevel, but less than that found in picture 5 from the White Steel – which is the way things are supposed to happen. More importantly, the edge of the edge smooths out, and the cutting test produced a practically indistinguishable result from the #1,500 Shapton Stone. That’s friggin’ impressive because my results off the #1,500 Shapton Pro are very difficult to beat. :D

For the next trick, I used a customer’s D-9 Damascus (RC~60) that came in for sharpening. There was a nice little chip in the edge which would’ve been easy enough to remove on the stones and belts, but I wanted to see how many licks it would take with the steel to get to the center of this chip. I also measured the “gap” along the way. Here is the “before picture”, and the same picture below it with the measurement of the width of the chip:

10a. Chip Before

10a. Chip Before

10. Chip Before

10. Chip Before

Then, with 10 strokes of the White Steel: I used what I would call an aggressive amount of pressure since I knew I was trying to fix the chip. Again, the picture followed by the same picture with the measurement. The chip which initially took up the majority of the screen width at 0.77 mm, was now only 0.46 mm – generously. The deepest part of the chip was about only half of that.

11a. Chip white steel x10

11a. Chip white steel x10

11. Chip white steel x10

11. Chip white steel x10

 

Then I did 10 more aggressive strokes on the White Steel, bringing it up to 20 strokes. Only the deepest part of the original chip remained, with a width of only 0.24 mm.

12a. Chip white steel x20

12a. Chip white steel x20

12. Chip white steel x20

12. Chip white steel x20

 

I followed this with a third round of strokes, bringing the total up to 30. There was no real evidence of the chip left at this point. I looked up and down the blade for any other indications of the chip, and there were none.

13. Chip white steel x30

13. Chip white steel x30

In keeping with the mentality of these steels, the White (Mohs 9) is the aggressive steel while the Black (Mohs 8) is the finishing steel. I then took 10 light, alternating strokes on the Black Steel.

 

14. Black Steel Final x10

14. Black Steel Final x10

I’d say this looks pretty freakin’ good! At a macro level, you can visibly see the micro bevel from the steeling (picture size is 13 mm wide by 9.75 mm high, and the actual micro bevel is approx. 0.22 mm wide). And because of the geometry behind the edge is still established and intact, the knife actually still cuts very smoothly despite it not being a 5K edge anymore.

15. D-9 Macro Black Steel Final

15. D-9 Macro Black Steel Final

Overall, the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Black and White steels can do quite an amazing job of maintaining knives – and can even handle small chips. More importantly, when used in conjunction with one another, they can help your knife maintain its edge for an extended period of time before needing a full resharpening.

The Magic Flute and Knives – Mozart’s Opera Masterpiece Made Better by Jende

June 17, 2015

Many people don’t know (but they will in a second!) that the very first opera I ever played was Mozart’s The Magic Flute my freshman year in college. It has a special place in my heart because I played second clarinet to my teacher at the time, Roger McKinney. Aside from that, I was never much of an opera fan because the stories are just too complicated to follow (but here’s the Cliff’s notes version), and while Die Zauberflöte is dear to me, I never saw it because I was sitting in the back row under the stage in the pit in college, and I never watched or listened to it since (except for The Queen of the Night’s Aria when soloists sang with the orchestra).

Well that all changed this past week. The Kaohsiung City Spring Arts Festival featured a full blown opera production of, you guessed it, Mozart’s The Magic Flute. It’s been a while since a professional level staging of an opera or ballet was done in Kaohsiung, so I was happy to secure tickets to finally see the show with my children some twenty-odd years later! It is common for outside talent to be brought in for the major solo parts, in this case The Queen of the Night, Papageno, and Sarastro were performed by famed Hungarian Colorarura Erika Miklósa,  American Baritone Philip Cutlip, and American Bass Jeremy Galyon.

Whenever soloists come through Kaohsiung, a group of us try to meet up with them for coffee or dinner to help with the some of the culture shock, and to give them a real taste of our wonderful little city instead of being carted around to the touristy places by overworked and underpaid cultural department workers. :) And this time we hit the jackpot – There was some interest in knives as gifts, so we suggested they swing on by our new workshop to see what all the fun was about. I can’t give all the juicy details of the fun we had without having to kill you, but we showed them EVERYTHING in the shop! and got a great video with a surprise cameo from Philip at 0:17 (don’t tell his agent!), and some great pictures of the aftermath:

Here’s the cameo video of our now famous Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steel Whack!,Whack!,Whack!,Whack! video:

And some nice family friendly pictures of some proud new owners of some Spirit Blades:

20150609_163255

At Jende Industries L-R: Erika Miklósa, Chris, Tom, Philip Cutlip

 

20150609_163340

At Jende Industries L-R: Erika Miklósa, Tom, Jeremy Galyon, Philip Cutlip

But that’s not all – We also secretly placed a 6 foot walking billboard at the opera rehearsal… When my wife (who is in the orchestra) saw it, she called me up and yelled at me – after getting pictures, of course!  :D

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Nothing says “Bass” like a Jende T-shirt!

Jeremy Galyon loves his Jende Shirt!

Jeremy Galyon loves his Jende Shirt!

So the big night finally arrived – The opera was a huge success all around! The most interesting thing was when the Queen of the Night was singing her famous aria, she gave Pamina a knife to kill Sarastro… I couldn’t help wondering at that point if that was why Erika had purchased 2 knives earlier in the week….

We were lucky enough to score a slightly blurry selfie with one of the Three Ladies (who were amazing together!)

One of the Three Ladies with my ladies!

One of the Three Ladies with my ladies!

With the closing of the opera’s run, we were lucky to spend a little more time with our new found friends before they had to depart for home. Jeremy joined us for breakfast, and had to leave first, but we were able to have a light lunch with Erika and Philip at one of my favorite places in Kaohsiung – Chung-Shan University, which has an amazing view, and is right on the beach.

20150615_124356

The sun deck at Chung Shan University

View from the sun deck at Chung Shan University

Sadly, the time came for us to say our goodbyes, and we turned the page on yet another amazing encounter with great people! We did get some good souvenirs, though… We had the entire cast sign the program for our daughters, and Erika and Philip left a little something extra for them as well.

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Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels – Black and White Ceramic Rods

June 9, 2015

We are proud to announce our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels! They come in white ceramic (Mohs 9) and black ceramic (Mohs 8), and feature anti-break technologies in the handles and tips.

….and for those who have broken their ceramic steels with the slightest touch in the past – check this test out!

Knife steels are a staple found in almost every chef’s knife kit, but not much is known about the different kinds of sharpening steels out there. The Jende White Steel is triple fired, which hardens the ceramic material to Mohs 9. This added hardness is ideal for maintaining knives made with softer steels, and can be used for more aggressive steeling action.

The Jende Black Steel is double fired, which blackens the ceramic material and hardens it to Mohs 8. This hardness and density is ideal for maintaining knives with harder steels, and is an excellent finishing steel for quick touch-ups on the go.

The advantage to using ceramic steels over metal or diamond is the overall edge that is produced. Metal sharpening steels either bend an edge back into position without abrading (which is not necessarily bad in the short term), or rip the steel from the edge of the knife, substantially lowering the overall sharpness of the edge, not to mention making it very weak (which is just plain bad).

Diamond sharpening steels will abrade everything, but can be a little too aggressive if you’re not careful. This is good for aggressive maintenance, but for touching up an edge, it can quickly erode the initial edge geometry. Depending on the fineness of the diamond steel, it may also be diminishing the overall sharpness, and/or leaving a serrated edge.

The Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels are designed with the idea that steels are used to maintain an edge in between sharpening. The Mohs 8 and 9 hardness of the steels work quickly and effectively, minimizing the loss of edge geometry while keeping the overall sharpness level intact. When using the Jende Sharpening Steels, it is recommended that your edge be sharpened between 1,000 and 3,000 grit .

Jende Giveaway this month! Free 8″ Spirit Blade Chef Knife

June 8, 2015

Our June 2015 Contest – Register to win a free 8″ Spirit Blade Chef knife from Jende Industries!

Spirit Blade 8" Chef Knife

20150601_134040

Our Spirit Blades are hand forged by Sword smith, Master Kuo, who made the Green Destiny sword for Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. Each blade is infused with human bone during the forging process, and the damascus patterns are truly mesmerizing and unique. Handles are made from African Rosewood with 2 small copper pins, and a beautiful mosaic pin of copper and stainless steel. For those involved in the spirit world, copper is an excellent conducting medium for spiritual energy. You can watch Master Kuo in action on this video.

This amazing chef knife is valued at $900.00! Entering to win is easy – go to the announcement of this contest on our Facebook page and follow the instructions!  Winner will be announced on July 1st 2015.

Good luck to everyone!

Jende Chef Knife Roll – Review by Celebrity Chef Kevin Gillespie

December 9, 2014

Chef Kevin Gillespie gave us one of the most amazing reviews of our new custom leather Chef Knife Roll on his facebook page! Chef Gillespie is a celebrity chef at his restaurant, Gunshow, in  Atlanta GA. He’s got a cookbook Fire in my Belly, has been featured on CNN and in Travel + Leisure, Food & Wine and Men’s Health magazines, and was a finalist and fan favorite on the show “Top Chef”. (You can read his full bio, here).  He’s also probably one of the nicest, down-to-earth guys on the planet.

Just in case you don’t have facebook, here are his exact words:

I get asked all the time to suggest gifts for the chef in someone’s life. Usually it’s a book, a gadget, or maybe a new knife. This year I want to share with you guys one of the finest chef gifts I have ever received. A custom made leather knife roll from Jende Industries. Not only is it beautiful to look at, it really gets the job done. I know it is not inexpensive, but it feels like it will last a lifetime. Check out my pics and the link below to see why I finally have an answer to “what should I get my chef?”

http://www.jendeindustries.com/products/knife-rolls-bags/product/253-jende-custom-knife-roll

…and here’s our video intro for some eye candy:

Thank you Chef Gillespie for the very kind words!

Have you subscribed to our Jende Industries YouTube page?

November 25, 2014

Our Jende Industries YouTube page has been around for a while under “jendeproducts”. We’ve put up some very interesting videos over the years with the intent of complimenting the hopefully useful content of this blog with a sound, informative and educational view of the products we sell and support.  We recommend subscribing to our page, as we have a bunch more videos in store for the future that will include a host of new products, as well as a gratuitous crazy shave video or two! Here’s a couple of classic videos from our youtube page:

My personal favorite was from filming the Maestro Wu D series knives. During the intro, there was an *ahem* “incident”…

Then we have our most famous video, with me shaving with a Kyocera ceramic knife…

And a nice product info video..

 

Jake Lieberstein – Now a Jende Reed Knife Retailer!

November 20, 2014

I’d like to welcome Jake Liebertstein to the Jende Reed Knife family! I first met Jake a few years back at a reed knife seminar at Oboe Works when they were at Columbus Circle in NY City. He was one of those students who took a deep interest in reed knife sharpening, and subsequently, in my method of sharpening reed knives. I’ve always been impressed with his work ethic and dedication to his oboe, and I’ve been particularly proud to watch his sharpening skills mature over the years.

I bumped into Jake again this past summer at IDRS in Manhattan, and was happy to find that he is now living in Chicago, and that he was ready to take on a few items to sell in his thriving reed making business. I was, and still am, honored that one of the first things he wished to sell was the Jende Reed Knife. So if you are in Chicago, or know Jake, look him up. He’s in the process of getting his webpage up, in the meantime, please contact him at jlieberstein@gmail.com.Kit-15

Diamond Bars by Ken Schwartz – For Buffers

November 17, 2014

We’re happy to announce that we now have Diamond Bars from Ken Schwartz! These specially formulated diamond bars are packed full of diamond abrasive, making them very fast, and very consistent. They also come in a wide range of grits – from 80 micron down to 0.10 micron! So if you’re removing rust from a blade, repairing chips, profiling or reprofiling, sharpening, or polishing the blade, these bars are essential.

Sun Yat Sen University 中山大學 – A Musical Exchange between China and Taiwan

November 14, 2014

I’ve been fortunate enough to be the conductor of the National Sun Yat-Sen University (中山大學) wind band club in Taiwan for the last 14 years. Opening it’s doors in 1980, it is a top 10 school with a full fledged music department, but the wind band club is made up entirely of non-music majors. We’ve had some great years, winning 2nd place in the National Southern Taiwan Band Competition, getting a “Highest Achievement” award from the Ministry of Education, and even performing for the University’s graduation ceremony. I’m fiercely proud of them, to say the least.

This year is host to a new milestone for our band. Dr. Sun Yat Sen (1866-1925), who’s nickname in Chinese is 中山, or Chung Shan, literally meaning “middle mountain”(originally called “Nakayama”, in Japanese – his story is quite amazing, actually!) is the father of Democracy in pre-communist China and later, democratic Taiwan, and is a highly respected figure in both countries. In 1924, he started a civic university what would become Chung Shan University in Guangzhou, China, and this year marks the 90th anniversary of the school’s founding. As part of the celebrations, the band, choir and string club students of the Taiwanese University were invited to take part in a joint concert to celebrate.

The timing was tough – it was midterms for the Taiwanese students – but we still managed to muster up 35 or so club members for the trip. As their band conductor, I was able to tag along, but I lurked in the background as this was about the China/Taiwan relations event, and not about me being the conductor. I went because as a somewhat protective teacher to my students, I wanted to make sure my students got the most out of this experience. These students are not music majors, they did not experience regional or all state bands, and I knew that this experience of many hours of rehearsals over several days would be a challenge for them, even though the final rewards would be immeasurable.

Day 1 was pretty exciting – a new university (actually not so very different, since it was technically “the same” university…)

Chung Shan University - China

Chung Shan University – China

Breakfast at the Student Union was actually pretty good! (All the school meals were unsettling good, actually – I was getting scared because institution food was not supposed to be so good…) Then onto the first rehearsal. There was that awkward moment when no one knows anyone, but everyone managed to find a chair.

First Rehearsal

First Rehearsal

The joint Choirs were not there yet so our students made the best of their free time and rehearsed on their own.

Choir Rehearsal

Choir Rehearsal

Here the conductor is rehearsing “more” of the choir. There were still quite a few more people who would show up!

Some of the full choir

Some of the full choir

After several grueling days, the students were definitely feeling the pain of the rehearsals, and lack of sleep – but it was soon time to check out the venue, and do a sound check and dress rehearsal.

Dress Rehearsal

Dress Rehearsal

And before you knew it, the concert was over! We got a few pics of our groups!

Band and String Clubs

Band and String Clubs

Choir Club

Choir Club

Support Team!

Support Team!

The results for my students was as I had hoped – they got a taste of what it is like to perform in a large orchestra with choir, and a taste of what it is like to endure the hours upon hours of unrelenting rehearsals with amazing conductors, so that just when they thought they couldn’t physically take it anymore, the excitement of the concert gave them that extra burst of energy which propelled them through an amazing performance experience that they will remember long after they graduate. And it was a job very well done, too. On a political, and more important personal growth note, they all made friends with people that are supposed to be political enemies, and through the beauty of music, were able to see that these sister-school students are not so different from each other, after all.

We are 中山大學!


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