Loading and Using the Jende Nanocloth Ultra Color Coded Strops –

September 20, 2016

We’ve done a quick and dirty video on how to load your Jende Color Coded Nanocloth Ultra Strops. These are the 4 micron 2×6″ with 4 micron CBN Emulsion and the 210×70 mm 0.25 Micron Poly Diamond Emulsion. Both strops and emulsions are color matched for easy recognition. 210×70 mm strops are designed to fit most stone holders as well. These strops are 3/4″ thick acrylic.

A special thanks to Mike Martinez of Martinez Blades and to Mark Reich of Reich Precision for allowing their razor and knife to make a cameo appearance.

The New 15K Jende Reed Knife

September 14, 2016

The New 15K Jende Reed Knife is now available! The 15K Jende Reed Knife has been around since Jende Industries first opened its doors, but it has just now received a complete overhaul.

The New 15K Jende Reed Knife now features a stainless steel that has slightly more complexity and wear resistance, giving a different type of edge that can hold up longer. It is still sharpened to 15,000 grit for control and effortless removal of cane. The handle is Madagascar Ebony, and is tapered to fit hands of all sizes. The handle has been laser etched with the Jende logo and sealed with 100% natural bee’s wax. The weight of the hardwood handle helps keep a neutral balance for scraping your oboe, bassoon, and clarinet reeds. The sheath is Stone Oiled leather for stylish protection of the blade.

Jende Nanocloth Ultra Strops – Color Coded for Your Pleasure!

September 9, 2016

We are happy introduce Jende Nanocloth Ultra, our newest innovation in stropping mediums!

jende-nanocloth-rainbow-big

Jende Nanocloth Ultra Rainbow

  • The Jende Nanocloth Ultra is a synthetic stropping material that has no weave, so feedback is the same in all directions. Other weaved strops tend to have noticeable resistance change feedback variations, like a rug when vacuuming, which can make you second guess your stropping stroke.
  • The Honeycomb structure is very consistent. The shape allows the emulsions to fill up the honeycombs, keeping more abrasive on the strop and off your knife. The shape also fills up and beads on the surface, giving a snow-shoe effect with even scratches when stropping.
jende-black-nanocloth-plain-400x

Jende Nanocloth Ultra – 400x

  • The depth of the honeycomb has little compression – less than leather in general.
  •  Because of the depth of abrasive in the honeycomb tubes, differential pressure can be used to give the strop more or less aggression by adding pressure for more aggression, and super light strokes to just tickle the edge for finish stropping.
  • The color-coded Acrylic base allows you to instantly recognize the grit strop you desire to use, saving time and confusion.
  • Laser etched to ensure long-lasting and clear identification marks.
  • Works equally well with our Jende Poly Diamond Sprays, Jende Poly Diamond Emulsions, and our Jende CBN Emulsions.

We are offing a huge variety of sizes on color coded acrylic, including 210x70mm and 2×6″ Bench strops on 3/4″ thick acrylic blocks, and for a full array of guided sharpening systems, including the Edge Pro (EP), Hapstone Sharpener, KME Sharpener, and Wicked Edge (WEPS).  Stropping will never be the same again!

Ken Schwartz Products Are No Longer Available

September 8, 2016

It is with great regret that we must inform everyone who has supported Jende Industries over the years that the relationship between Ken Schwartz of Precise Sharpening and Jende Industries has come to an end as of June 18th, 2016. Ken Schwartz’s products are no longer available for purchase.

There is a long, vibrant, and fruitful history between Jende and Ken, but amongst other irreconcilable differences that we’d rather not discuss publicly, it has mainly come to a point where chronic inconsistency of supply and delivery times on Ken’s part was hurting our reputation and customer service record. We have put up a notice on our website to this effect, and have since developed our own improved line of  Jende CBN and Poly Diamond Emulsions. We have also added our own Nanocloth Ultra, Kangaroo, and Leather strops to accommodate sharpeners of all types, be it free hand, mechanized, or guided. We are sorry for any inconvenience this may cause. In the mean time, we strongly recommend considering the Jende Strops and Compounds, found on our site, here.

 

Jende Artisan Mall – Just One of the Changes at Jende

May 27, 2016

We’ve recently made some serious changes to our website! www.jendeindustries.com has gotten a long overdue upgrade and is now on a much more powerful and versatile platform! One of the major changes is the addition of the Jende Artisan Mall. The Jende Artisan Mall is is a gathering place for amazing and talented artisans whose products and services compliment our own.  It’s best described as a farmers market. And like farmers markets, it’s populated with local and regional artisans who bring together the diversity, vibrancy, and creativity of the community under one roof.

Jende Artisan Mall

The Jende Artisan Mall is quite diverse, as we span a large area of all things sharpening. The purpose of the mall is to encourage our customers to discover a wider range of related artisans within the area or areas of their own interests. On the flip side, since many artisans prefer to concentrate on the quality of their products over marketing them, the Artisan Mall gives them exposure to a wider audience – and not just for exposure’s sake.

The major areas actually mirror those of the main Jende categories, and expand to more specific areas, such as custom knife makers, oboe and bassoon reed makers, shaving soaps, custom woodworking, and sharpening services, just to name a few. So we hope everyone will come by and check out the new site, and support the Jende Artisan Mall!

TOG Elite Japanese Kitchen Knives Review

April 25, 2016

We recently received a TOG Elite Japanese Kitchen Chef Knife Santoku for testing. Bottom Line: This is one very nice knife that handles well, keeps its edge, and just plain looks good.

TOG Elite Japanese Knives

TOG Elite Japanese Knives

 

On the TOG website, there is a “Tech Specs” page that lists all the wonderful, interesting, and even nerdy things about the knives.  I’ve decided that my review will focus around the claims on that page.

  • “TOG blades are made from a special steel… to produce the ridiculously sharp blade and ensure that it stays sharp.” 
  • “Incredible cutting performance from a central layer of high-carbon (1%) steel. This core is made from… Acuto 440 that is similar to Western ‘440C’. This is hardened to Rockwell Hardness (HRC) 58-60…”

As an OCD sharpener, any claims to sharpness are always met with (rolled eyes or yawn) “Oh, yes, it is.”  I then proceed to lick the entire edge of the blade  – twice.  :) The TOG blade, however, actually looked and felt surprisingly sharp upon checking the edge right out of the box – sharp enough for me to not employ the old tongue test. So I went straight to the paper cutting test, expecting a typical 240 grit with a buffed edge feel. I was shocked by my first cut, so much so that I took another slice into the paper just to make sure. This thing cut -no- SLICED through the paper in a way that was not the usual factory edge. This was much, much better. I was truly impressed. If I had to call the grit, I would say about 3K. Score 1 for TOG right out of the box.

Edge retention is always going to vary depending on the user and the tasks performed, but when I sharpened up the TOG to my usual angles and finish, it kept up as good as, if not a little better than my usual knives (RC57-58). The knives in the rotation were all freshly sharpened by me, and used in a professional kitchen over a 2 week period with no special treatment (believe me!), and were only adjusted with a sharpening steel by the sometimes brutish kitchen personnel.

Steel junkies say what you will about 440C, but the Acuto 440 steel in this blade is perfect at RC 58-60. IMO, RC 56-60 is the Goldilocks hardness zone for high quality, non-custom kitchen knives – hard enough to hold the edge so that it does not require steeling after every cut, and flexible enough so that the edge won’t chip out. RC 58-60 also makes maintenance on the edge easy and straight forward on just about any good quality sharpening equipment, be it a steel, stones or mechanized sharpeners. I used 220, 1K, and 4K sharpening stones and got a smooth edge with just enough bite. As a sharpener, I am quite satisfied with the quality.

As for the feel of the edge when in use, it actually felt more akin to VG-10 steel, and not even remotely close the soft mushy stuff that your 29-piece knife set in a woodblock has (usually RC ~52). The overall balance and handling of the knife was easy and light, and the thinness of the blade allowed for easy cutting and slicing.

So to sum it up, this is one very nice knife that handles well, keeps its edge, and just plain looks good.

Thank you to the fine people at TOG for the opportunity!

Breaking the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steel

October 23, 2015

Talk to anyone who has a conventional ceramic sharpening steel and they most likely will only let you look at it from a distance – which is dangerous enough in itself – and you’ll never get to use it, of course. That is because ceramic sharpening steels are notoriously fragile, and have taken on the same stigma as the famed Ford Pinto, whose gas tanks famously exploded on the slightest impact.

Well, let me tell you – our Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels can take some of the meanest looks out there, and even hold back the tears when getting a good verbal lashing.  The anti-break technologies incorporated into the handle, the rod and the tip allow the Jende Ceramic Steels to take a good beating, too. We’ve done a previous “bam bam bam bam bam” test, which can be seen here, and now we have done an official drop test, showing that it is now safe for your friends to at least hold your ceramic steel, even if they are not worthy of using it!

Now, as much as we’d like to, we are not claiming the Jende Ceramic Sharpening Steels to be indestructible. They employ anti-break technologies that are designed to allow the steel to stay intact if dropped accidentally, or if bumped into another object, etc. during the rigors of everyday commercial and/or home use. For due diligence, we escalated our tests to see what exactly it would take to break one of our steels, and this was the last known surviving picture of the poor Jende Ceramic Steel that sacrificed its life in the name of science. His name was Brian, after the bastard that killed him.

jende ceramic steel

 

We’re Fundraising for Breast Cancer Awareness Month! Donate and you can win a Chef Knife Roll!

October 8, 2015

Everybody here at Jende Industries loves breasts, but hates cancer. So we put together a fundraiser to celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and will donate 100% of the money raised to the American Cancer Society! For a donation of only US $10.00 you can enter to win a custom pink Jende Chef Knife Roll along with a matching chef’s coat from Chef Works! A winner will be announced November 1, 2015. You can donate at our fundrazr page, here: https://fundrazr.com/campaigns/812rAd  Our collaborators include Olga Liao of Creep Leather, Colin Brown of Model Mosa, Amanda Stuckey of Chef Works, Frans van der Lee of Chef’s Roll, and Nicko Salas of Chefs Talk. Even if you don’t want to win the bag, you can still donate! Thank you!

 

 

Microscope Porn: How To Post It Correctly

August 1, 2015

With all the microscope porn on many of the sharpening and honing social media and forums lately, there needs to be a more standardized way to document the magnification. There are many available microscopes on the market, and the stated magnification levels are all over the map – from 3x to 1200x. Ironically, having the magnifications in these settings is irrelevant because we can enlarge and magnify pictures for various viewing needs, which often contradicts the stated magnification. It is therefore more important to know and state the actual area or size of the picture.

This tutorial will help to solve some of the uncertainties about knowing what the actual size of your pictures are rather than the so-called magnification. Please keep in mind that this is not in any way a comment on the quality of any of the scopes mentioned here. They are all very good, and extremely useful learning tools.

So, the easiest way to know your picture’s dimensions at a given magnification is to simply take a picture of a ruler under your scope, and state the dimensions when posting pics. This could be a USB scope, a scope attached to your cell phone, an optical scope, etc..

Below is a Veho at  20x. The pictured area is 6mm wide by 8mm high.

1 Ruler 20x ~6mm high

Ruler 20x ~6mm high

5 Ruler 20x ~8mm wide

Ruler 20x ~8mm wide

However, the Veho at 40x is 10mm high by 13mm wide! According to the magnification, the image sizes should be smaller (in theory, 3mm high x 4mm wide), but clearly the USB scopes don’t magnify the same as the scientific ones do. Hence, the issues with stating magnifications vs. stating the actual size of the pictured area.

2 Ruler 40x ~10mm high

Ruler 40x ~10mm high

6 Ruler 40x ~13mm wide

Ruler 40x ~13mm wide

To take it a little further, here is the Veho at 200x, which is 1mm high by 1.5mm wide. This is hardly a 10 times or even 5 times magnification of the 20x or 40x above.

3 Ruler 200x ~1mm high

Ruler 200x ~1mm high

7 Ruler 200x ~1.5mm wide

Ruler 200x ~1.5mm wide

And lastly, the Veho at 400x, just to drive the point home.🙂 the picture is 0.75mm high by 1mm wide. Again, not the same ratio of magnification to the real size of the picture.

4 Ruler 400x 0.75mm high

Ruler 400x 0.75mm high

8 Ruler 400x ~1mm wide

Ruler 400x ~1mm wide

OK, so we get that part now.🙂 On scopes with software packages, you can measure out the dimensions, and even set a “bar,” which represents a specified length, much like a map has a scale in KM or miles. In the example below, famed razor honer Dr. Matt has set his Dino Lite scope’s bar to 50.0 microns, which can be seen in the lower left hand corner of the picture. That means the entire area of the picture, no matter how large or small on your screen, will be approximately 300 microns wide by 250 microns high, or 0.3 mm wide by 0.25 mm high. Dr. Matt’s microscope is quite nice, you’ll notice there is also more information on the top tabs of the picture, including the “magnification” and screen resolution in pixels.

Dr. Matt’s bar is 50 microns

While Dr. Matt’s image as-is is self explanatory, if he didn’t have the bar or tabs and was citing this picture for others, he would say something like “This picture was taken with a Dino Lite 900, and the picture dimensions are 0.3 mm wide by 0.25 mm high.” This way we all know for sure just how close we are to getting our eyes sliced opened.😀 BTW – stating the actual size of this picture makes Matt’s work even more impressive!

In conclusion, taking just a little time and a couple of pictures before hand to measure the actual size of your pictures will prove to be a more valuable asset to understanding what these pictures represent, and therefore make learning from them easier for the user, and for the rest of us in the peanut gallery. Thanks!

Ken Schwartz’s Corner Now On The Jende Industries Website!

July 7, 2015

With some restructuring of the Jende Industries website, we’ve finally grouped all of Ken Schwartz’s products into Ken Schwartz’s Corner! Now you can find your Nubatama Edge Pro Stones, CBN Emulsions, and Kangaroo Strops all with one easy click (after easily navigating to the sharpening products on our home page).

Ken Schwartz’s products are arguably the highest quality around, and we’ve been carrying all of his products since day 1. He’s a mad scientist’s mad scientist, with a background in medicine and a bunch of other really smart things, and he’s single-handedly changed the way we use compounds in the sharpening world with his CBN and Diamond sprays and emulsions that now span a huge grit range – from 180 micron down to 0.025 micron, not to mention his introduction of Nanocloth as the preferred medium for sub-micron stropping – and it works well on the coarser grits, too!

Ken Schwartz circa 2011

We hope to be filling out the Ken Schwartz Corner with even more goodies shortly, so keep an eye out!